Law Office of Dahlia Castillo, PLLC
  

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JOIN OUR TEAM! -LEGAL ASSISTANT -FAYETTEVILLE AND FUQUAY-VARINA OFFICE

Posted on January 4, 2021 at 6:10 PM

THE POSITION

We are hiring a full-time or part-time Bilingual (English and Spanish) Legal Assistant. This position requires someone who cares for the community we serve, has good attention to detail, and excellent organizational skills. Criminal law and immigration law experience is required. Excellent telephone skills are required. Most of our clients are immigrants and speak Spanish. Must be bilingual in English and Spanish.

MISSION OF THE JOB

Take ownership of cases, provide exceptional customer service, and prepare quality work product.

OUTCOMES

Within the 6 months on the job:

• Adhere to firm mission and culture

• Be able to prepare quality filings with as much accuracy as possible and minimal supervision for attorney review.

• Collect client information diligently, strategically, and independently.

• Draft forms, cover letters, declarations, and packets accurately with minimal supervision for attorney review.

• Maintain communication with clients and provide case updates promptly

• Manage attorney schedule efficiently (attorney-client meetings, court appearances, etc.)

• Prepare pleading and motion for family court

• Draft discovery requests and responses

• Process criminal cases for trial preparation including legal documents, data entry, and correspondence.

• Complete a daily court calendar, obtains jury panels, and issues discovery to defense attorneys.

• Request criminal history documentation including national, state, and local criminal histories, booking photos, arrest records, juvenile criminal histories, and Bureau of Motor Vehicle records.

• Schedule appointments for attorney to meet with deputy prosecutors, depositions, and pretrial conferences.

• Assist victims with restitution information, no contact orders, subpoenas, and court dates.

• Communicate with law enforcement individuals at the federal, state, and local level, the public, and victims and witnesses in criminal cases.

• Communicating with court clerks, mediators, and other court personnel.

Competencies

• Ability to produce or be productive

• Positive attitude

• Ability to listen closely and follow instructions

• Ability to set priorities and meet tight deadlines

• Attention to detail

• Fluency in written and oral English and Spanish

• Conduct legal research to support legal proceedings

• Teamwork

• Great organization, planning, follow-through, and time-management skills

• Ability to effectively communicate with clients and co-workers

• Strong Computer skills (Microsoft office, particularly excel, drive, word)

• Strong Office Machine skills (copier, scan machine)

• Professional attitude and demeanor

To be considered for this position, you MUST send BOTH a resume and cover letter describing your relevant experience and skills with your resume by email, and a legal writing sample. (This shows you can follow instructions)

Job Type: Full-time 8:30 AM to 5 PM, Monday - Friday (some maybe weekends)

Salary: $15.00 to $18.00 /hour


Benefits effective after 6 months of employment:

• Paid time off for full-time (sick and personal day)

• Paid for all firm holidays

• Paid 1 week vacation after of employment

• flexibility

• Potential for bonus


Education:

· Associate (Preferred)

· Paralegal or Legal Assistant: 2 year (Required)

· Criminal and/family Paralegal or Legal Assistant: 1 year (Preferred)

· Paralegal certificate (Preferred)

License:

· Notary Public (Preferred) or willing to take the class and test

We are excited to offer this job opportunity. To apply, please send the following to dcilcareers@gmail.com and assistant.drclawfirm@gmail.com with the subject line reading "LODC LEGAL ASSISTANT FEBRUARY 2021-FAYETTEVILLE" OR "LODC LEGAL ASSISTANT FEBRUARY 2021-FUQUAY-VARINA OFFICE"

1. Resume

2. Detailed cover letter explaining why you feel this job might be a good fit for you, and which skills you have to apply to the task

3. Writing sample in English and Spanish (for example, please write in English and Spanish, no more than 1000 words, as to why you would like to work with helping immigrants). At the end of each writing sample, please note the word count (i.e. exact number of words) as calculated by MSWord or other software program.

4. Three references that can verify prior work experience (reference list should include contact information)

 

JOIN OUR TEAM! PART-TIME LEGAL RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARY

Posted on December 28, 2020 at 10:20 PM

PART-TIME LEGAL RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARY

The Law Office of Dahlia Castillo has an immediate opening for a part-time legal receptionist/Secretary in their Fayetteville Office. There is a potential of full-time employment in the future. Our primary areas are immigration, family law, and criminal defense.

 

Job Description

1. Sit at front desk, as well as on occasion in the office workroom/other offices, to assist clients

2. Answer phone calls in English and Spanish (being bilingual in written and spoken Spanish is required)

3. Assist with appointment booking and call/contact people to confirm their appointments

4. Send consultation appointment reminders of confirmed appointments. After a consultation has started, help by making photocopies of documents for the attorney; booking return appointments; and talking to prospective clients to see how their experience was or if they need anything

5. Ensure phone calls are directed accordingly and take detailed phone messages

6. Greet guests and clients of the office at reception in a professional, friendly, and hospitable manner

7. Provide customer service of the highest quality; be patient with immigrant clients and their family members

8. Type memos, correspondence, letters to clients as needed. Must be able to write a basic business letter in English and Spanish

9. Update case management system if needed, with very accurate recounts of client conversations or information

10. Prepare letters for office guests who need a letter to their boss or school confirming that their absence was necessary for a legal meeting.

11. Listen very carefully to attorney, office manager and legal assistant to be able to pass on responses and messages to callers and clients

12. Make tea or coffee for staff or guests (or both); offer water or coffee or tea to every visitor; put water at conference room table for all consultation guests; also clean up conference room/meeting rooms and recycle cups/put away items after meetings are done

13. Translate documents from clients

14. Take inventory of supplies for office manager


The candidate MUST:

- Both write and speak English and Spanish fluently

- Know how to work with computers (especially with Microsoft Office programs)

- Be willing to work overtime (will be compensated appropriately)

- Perform light office cleaning and organization, daily, such as checking lobby/waiting room for cleaning needs; wiping down both sides of office glass door; wife down both sides of front door; wipe down all office desks; disinfect all phones with sanitizing wipes daily; disinfect laptops for whole office, daily; take out trash and replace can liners; disinfect door handles; keep Keurig machine filled with clean water

- Have good communication skills, both written and spoken

- Be able to arrive on time for work and remain for the entirety of their shift (unless previous arrangements have been made)

- Talk to traumatized, frustrated incoming callers (the majority of whom are foreign nationals), with kindness but appropriate boundaries, and assist them with directing their query accordingly. For callers who need a referral to a different lawyer or agency, provide referral as directed by attorney or management

 

Work hours and Salary:

Monday and Friday, 12:00 PM to 5 PM.

Tuesday to Thursday: 10:00 PM to 5 PM. with 30 minute unpaid lunch

 

Pay rate: $12/hour. Any overtime will be paid accordingly, with opportunities for a raise to come in the following months.

 

We are excited to offer this job opportunity. To apply, please send the following to dcilcareers@gmail.com and assistant.drclawfirm@gmail.com with the subject line reading "LODC RECEPTIONIST FEBRUARY 2021"

 

1. Resume

2. Detailed cover letter explaining why you feel this job might be a good fit for you, and which skills you have to apply to the task

3. Writing sample in English and Spanish (for example, please write in English and Spanish, no more than 1000 words, as to why you would like to work with helping immigrants). At the end of each writing sample, please note the word count (i.e. exact number of words) as calculated by MSWord or other software program.

4. Three references that can verify prior work experience (reference list should include contact information)

 

We require at least 1 year of full or part-time experience as a receptionist, Secretary or having worked in another professional office such as a doctor’s office, for this position.

COVID-19 Precaution(s):

 

• Personal protective equipment provided or required

 

• Plastic shield at workstations

 

• Temperature screenings

 

• Social distancing guidelines in place

 

• Sanitizing, disinfecting, or cleaning procedures in place

 

YOU HAD AN ARGUMENT WITH YOUR SPOUSE AND HE WITHDREW THE I-130,THEN YOU KISSED AND MADE UP. NOW WHAT?

Posted on December 17, 2016 at 4:55 PM Comments comments (160)

Let's face it -- most people do not make well thought out decisions when they are upset.  When we are mad at our spouses we may say and do things that we later regret. So what happens  if your spouse withdraws the I-130 petition as a result of an argument, and you both have since reconciled?  Should you notify USCIS and inform them that you are now "back together" and want to proceed?


Once USCIS receive notice to withdraw the petition; it dies!  There is nothing that can be done to reinstate this I-130 petition. The immigrant spouse cannot prevent the US citizen spouse or lawful permanent resident spouse from withdrawing their petition.  If the spouses "kissed and made up" and want to proceed with the green card processs, a new I-130 petition is required. You will need to submit a new filing fee and supporting documents to show you and your spouse are in a "bonafide" (real) marriage. You will have go to another biometric appointment (even if you had done so on the previously filed petition). 


It must be noted that your green card interview may be hard since the immigration officer or consular officer will want to know about the previous petition and the reason it was withdrawn. You and your immigrant spouse may be under a microscope  and questioned heavily because they will think that your marriage is not "bonafide."


Similarly, if you are divorced before USCIS made a decision on your I-130 petition, USCIS will deny the petition as soon as they find out. If the I-130 is apart of an adjustment of status application (if the immigrant spouse in the United States) , the I-485 (Application to Register Permanent Resident)  and  I-765 (Employment Authorization Card) applications will be denied. USCIS will not approve an immigrant visa  if the couples divorce.


Likewise, if the I-130 has been approved, you paid your immigrant visa fees, submitted your documents to the National Visa Center (NVC) and affidavit of support, but not the DS260 and got divorced, the consular will approve only if you can prove that the divorce was not valid. 


If you are in this situation or have questions about what was discussed in this blog, please contact us.


Dahlia Radcliffe-Castillo, a Jamaican immigrant, has been practicing immigration law for the past five years. She practices solely immigration law to ensure she develops the expertise in one area of law and stays up to date with the latest changes instead of juggling several areas of law. She represent clients throughout the United States and the world.


#immigrant #greencard #lawfulpermanentresident #I130petition #I485petition #I765petition #DS260 #EAD #marriage #fayettevilleimmigrationattorney #immigrationlawyer #fayettevillelawyer 

The Effects of Undocumented Family Members and Secret Clearance

Posted on October 14, 2016 at 7:25 PM Comments comments (57)

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In this video, I discuss the effects of having an undocumented family on your security clearance. As a military member or as the loved one of someone in the #military, it is important that you understand how #immigration laws apply to you. As a military spouse, I am honored to help military men and women as well as their family members, achieve their #greencard or #citizenship goals. Call me today at 888-638-5167. Free Consultation for Active- Duty military #immigration #usmilitary #k1visa #k3visa #greencard #fayettevilleimmigration #veterans #fayettevillenc #fortbraggnc

Fayetteville Immigration Attorney

Fayetteville Immigration Lawyer

601 Waiver - Extreme Hardship Waiver

Posted on October 14, 2016 at 7:10 PM Comments comments (0)

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If you have been denied a visa to the US even though you are married to a US citizen, usually because of a prior immigration violation or criminal history, you may need a waiver. 

For more info call 888-638-5167. Free Consultation for Active- Duty military #immigration #usmilitary #k1visa #k3visa #greencard #fayettevilleimmigration #veterans #fayettevillenc #fortbraggnc

Marriage to a Foreign National Outside the United States: What do you need to know about marrying if you're in the #military?

Posted on October 14, 2016 at 6:05 PM Comments comments (0)


Dahlia Radcliffe-Castillo, principal immigration attorney of Dahlia Castillo Immigration Law a Fayetteville Immigration law office. She discusses what military service members need to know about marrying when stationed overseas.

For more info send us a message at the contact us tab or call 888-638-5167. Free Consultation for Active- Duty military #immigration #usmilitary #k1visa #k3visa #greencard #fayettevilleimmigration #veterans #fortbraggnc #fayettevillenc

I AM A GREEN CARD HOLDER WHO HAS COMMITTED A CRIME�?� WILL I BE DEPORTED?

Posted on March 28, 2016 at 11:15 AM Comments comments (0)

One of the questions I get asked a lot is whether a person will get deported for an arrest or crime conviction. This is a normal concern and I would be scared too. Whether or not you’re going to be deported for a criminal conviction is going to depend on the conviction. Immigration has a broad range of crimes that make you removable from the United States. Even if it’s a misdemeanor under criminal law, that doesn’t mean it’s a minor offence for immigration law. Generally, drug offences are going to always make you removable from the United States, except in the case of a small amount of marijuana if you are in the United States. Anything else, such as a theft offense, a fraud offense, or a violent felony can make you removable from the United States.

 

Just because a criminal lawyer says something was dismissed, may not be true for immigration law.

 

Often time a lawful permanent resident will make the mistake that a plea agreement for time served, probation or conditional discharge is not a conviction, but it is for immigration purposes. Just because a criminal lawyer says something was dismissed, may not be true for immigration law just because under criminal law it wasn’t a big penalty. If you didn’t go to jail and only did probation, that does not mean it’s not serious for immigration law. It’s very important to understand the criminal conviction and bring that to an immigration lawyer with all of your documentation to discuss it thoroughly and make sure you understand the consequences of that criminal conviction. This can affect your chance of applying for citizenship, if you decide to travel outside the country or even apply to renew your green card.

 

It is very important that your criminal lawyer tells you the immigration consequences or you speak with an immigration lawyer.

 

Most importantly, if you are dealing with a criminal case currently and have pending charges, it is very important that your criminal lawyer tells you the immigration consequences or you speak with an immigration lawyer. This required under criminal law now that a criminal lawyer makes certain that you understand the immigration consequences.

 

If you are in this situation and you would like to discuss the specifics of your case, please call our office to schedule a consultation via Skype or telephone. Because immigration is federal law, I can help you anywhere you live. We have clients in other countries, like Kuwait, Germany and throughout the U.S. whom we have never met in person and still help them get to their goal.

I am the owner and founder of Dahlia R Castillo Law Firm: A Virtual Immigration Law Office. My goal was to create an alternative way of providing immigration service at the convenience of the clients anytime and from anywhere by using bank grade technology.

IMMIGRATION OFFICERS RESPOND LIKE GOD ANSWERS PRAYERS: YES, NO, WAIT

Posted on June 6, 2015 at 8:50 AM Comments comments (64)

You have been waiting for months for the “Big” day – your green card interview. You are overwhelmed by all sorts of emotions – excitement, anxiety, fear – all piled into one. You are praying to God that your nerves do not get the best of you. The immigration officer asks you a barrage of questions about your marriage and jots down notes. The immigration officer flips through your application maybe about ten times. In spite of your nerves, you thought your interview well. So towards the end you were pretty sure your green card would be approved on the spot. But he hands you a piece of paper that said your file is being held for further review.

 

 

Notice of Interview Results: “Your case is being held for review. At this time, USCIS does not require any further information or documents from you. Should further information or documents be required, you will receive a notice in the mail.”

 

 

Say what?!!!!!

 

What does this mean? Was my green card approved or denied?

 

The immigration officer responds to green card applicants like God answers prayers: “yes,” “no,” and “wait”.

 

A notice of interview results is not at all unusual.The green card interview can end in one of three ways: (1) approved with a temporary I-551 stamped in your passport, (2) application denied, or (3) your application is held for review.

 

Number three is the most confusing and frightening experience for the green card applicants and their families. Once the interview is completed, the officer may review the case and at times, may also review it with his/her supervisor. What normally happens, depending on the officer’s workload, he/she still has some security or background checks to conduct. The immigration officer will update the system to generate the approval notice and the green card. As a matter of policy, the immigration officer must give the applicant something and this notice of review is the routine to let the green card applicant know that their application is still pending. If any information is missing, the applicant will be notified and be provided with time to submit it. If all documentation is complete and there are no issues, then the green card applicant will be notified and receive his/her green card in the mail.

 

that we would be notified by mail of the decision, and we should wait 60 days before inquiring about the case status. He didn’t say anything else. We weren’t asked for any further evidence and the box for ‘background checks’ was not checked on the letter. The box that was checked just said: ‘your file is being held for further review before a decision can be made’.

 

Bottom line: Probably nothing to worry about.

Hundreds protest Obama's immigration policy in South Texas

Posted on May 4, 2015 at 12:40 AM Comments comments (72)

Hundreds of people began arriving in Dilley on Saturday to protest the Obama administration's policy of detaining immigrant families.  

http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/article/Hundreds-protest-Obama-s-immigration-policy-in-6238231.php

Obama Announces Executive Action on Immigration

Posted on November 22, 2014 at 1:20 PM Comments comments (0)

On November 20, 2014, President Obama, acting within his legal authority, like many of his predecessors before him, announced a series of executive orders on immigration. This executive order will offer temporary relief to over five million of undocumented immigrants.

Some of the most critical executive orders are as follows:


Cracking down on illegal immigration at the border

The President’s actions increase the chances that anyone attempting to cross the border illegally today will be caught and sent back. This will also centralize border security command-and-control to continue to crack down on illegal immigration.


Deporting Felons, NOT Families

The President’s actions focus on the deportation of people who threaten national security and public safety. He has directed immigration enforcement to place anyone suspected of terrorism, violent criminals, gang members, and recent border crossers at the top of the deportation priority list.


Expand of Deferred Action for Childhood (DACA) Arrival Program

DACA eligibility will expand to include a broader class of children. Prior to this executive order, DACA eligibility was limited to those who were under 31 years of age on June 15, 2012, who entered the U.S. before June 15, 2007, and who were under 16 years old when they entered. DACA eligibility will be expanded to cover all undocumented immigrants who entered the U.S. before the age of 16, and not just those born after June 15, 1981. This expansion requires continuous residence in the United States since January 1, 2010, rather than the prior requirement of June 15, 2007. It also, expands the employment authorization to three years from the current two years.


Extend Deferred Action for Parents Accountability (DAPA) of U.S. Citizens or Lawful Permanent Resident

An undocumented individual will have the opportunity to request temporary relief from deportation and work authorization for three years, if they come forward and register, submit biometric data, pass background checks, pay fees and show that their child was born on or before November 20, 2014.


Expand Provisional Waivers to Spouses and Children of Lawful Permanent Residents

The spouse and children of Lawful Permanent Residents will have the opportunity request a provisional waiver. The provisional waiver program announced in 2013 allowed the spouses, sons or daughters of U.S. citizens to receive a waiver if a visa is available. Under the President’s action, this provisional waiver will extend to Lawful Permanent Resident Spouses and children as well. There may be instances when the qualifying relative is not the petitioner.


Promote Naturalization Process

Individuals who are eligible to apply for U.S citizenship will educated about the benefits of being a U.S. Citizen. They will have an opportunity to be to use credit cards to pay the application fee and potential partial fee waiver.


Support High-skilled Business and Workers

The President's action authorizes parole, on a case-by-case basis, to eligible inventors, researchers and founders of start-up enterprises who may not yet qualify for a national interest waiver, but who have been awarded substantial U.S. investor financing; or otherwise hold the promise of innovation and job creation through the development of new technologies or the pursuit of cutting-edge research. Finalize a rule to provide work authorization to the spouses of certain H-1B visa holders who are on the path to lawful permanent resident status.


USCIS is not accepting applications at this time. However, individuals who think they may be eligible for one or more of the new initiatives may prepare now by gathering documentation that establishes factors such as their identity, relationship to U.S. Citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident and continuous residence in the U.S for the last five years.


USCIS expects to begin accepting applications for the Expanded DACA program approximately February 20, 2015 and Deferred action for parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents (Deferred Action for Parental Accountability) approximately April 20, 2015.


For more information or questions regarding your eligibility, please contact our office 888.638.5167

 

 



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